Adjusting to Life With Dentures

Your teeth are tough and designed to last a lifetime. But disease, decay, or injury can wreak havoc on your teeth, sending you to replacement options like dentures. While few things are as good as the original, dentures have come a long way since the bone-and-wood days of old. In fact, modern dentures excel in both form and function, but they do take some getting used to.

At Dastrup Dental, under the expert direction of Dr. Joseph Dastrup, we offer a wide array of options for replacing missing teeth, including full and partial dentures. These prosthetic devices meet all the criteria for chewing, speaking, and smiling, which you will realize after a small adjustment period.

To help you transition from your old teeth to your shiny, new dentures, here are a few tips.

A new presence

Through the years, you’ve grown accustomed to your teeth, rarely giving them a second thought. When we replace your old teeth with partial or full dentures, your immediate reaction will likely be one of unfamiliarity. When you place a foreign object in your mouth, your body takes notice and needs time to adjust as your new teeth take up residence.

Be patient during the first few weeks of wearing dentures as you familiarize yourself with the new presence in your mouth. You might want to eat softer foods during this time that don’t require a lot of chewing. And cut up your food into smaller chunks so you can get used to chewing in smaller doses. 

Picking up the slack

If you encounter any minor soreness along your gums, this is perfectly normal as they adjust to the dentures. Remember, your original teeth had roots that went down into your jawbone. Dentures, on the other hand, rely more on your gums for security, so it takes time for them to adjust to the new burden. 

If, however, the soreness persists or it’s really uncomfortable, simply come in and see us so we can make a few tweaks that should help.

Sing a song

With replacement teeth, speaking may present some new challenges. To speed up your adjustment to talking with dentures, try singing. Sing in the car, in the shower, or wherever is comfortable. Because singing is less choppy than talking, you quickly learn the new mechanics of your dentures without the frustration of struggling with your speech when you’re in conversation with others.

Find the best fit

Many dentures require adhesives to provide extra security for your teeth. As you adjust to your new dentures, you may want to experiment with different adhesives and find one that’s right for you. We can supply you with a list of your best options.

Stretch your mouth

Your mouth has plenty of muscles that control talking, smiling, chewing, and swallowing. Take the time to stretch out these muscles, which are being asked to perform slightly differently with dentures. 

Open your mouth, slide your lower jaw from side to side, and flex the muscles in your mouth and jaw so that they’re not overly contracted for long periods as they adjust to life with dentures.

Cleaning up

One of the biggest adjustments to wearing dentures is that your daily dental care is a little more involved. But just like your original teeth, vigilant care of your dentures and your gums goes a long way toward a successful experience with dentures.

Rest assured, we give you a full list of instructions for the care of your mouth and your dentures.

If you practice a little patience and take a few steps to ease the transition to dentures, these replacement teeth will feel as if they’ve been your constant companions for years in no time at all.

If you have more questions about adjusting to dentures, please don’t hesitate to give us a call or use the online scheduling tool to set up an appointment.

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